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Peak Climbing in Nepal

Peak Climbing18 peaks of Nepal have been designated as "Trekking Peaks" and Nepal Mountaineering Association issues permission for climbing expedition with simple formalities. Some of these peaks are easy "walk ups" where as others are technical and sometime can be dangerous. A team of guides, Sherpas, porters, kitchen crews with all kitchen and camping gears are necessary to undertake such expeditions.

Climbing Rules

  1. Any individual or mountaineering team desirous of climbing the peak must receive permission from Nepal Mountaineering Association.
  2. Permission to climb the peaks will be granted for a period of one month only.
  3. Permission may be extended, if necessary, for another period of two weeks.
  4. The period of permission granted relates to time spent for climbing above the base camp. The trek to and from the base camp is not included.
  5. Application for climbing permit may be made at any time by the concerned Mountaineering team. Permit will be granted on a first come first serve basis.
  6. Each climbing party will be given a permit . The right to give permission to another party for climbing the same peak during the same period is reserved by Nepal Mountaineering Association.
  7. Nepal Mountaineering Association will recommend to Immigration Office of His Majesty's Government for obtaining trekking permit of the area to the team Members.  

Climbing Equipments  
We provide all camping and kitchen gears that is necessary for an organized expedition. But participants of climbing expedition, apart from regular trekking gears have to be equipped with following climbing gears. Although, there is buying or renting possibilities of these gears in Kathmandu or Pokhara, it is always recommended that you bring them of your best fit from your home. Some climbers have been reported to abandon the trip because the harness is too small or crampons do not fit or are too big for the boots or so on.

  1. Main ropes/ Fix Ropes (50-200m)
  2. Ice-Screws and stakes
  3. Climbing boots with Crampons and Get Ups.
  4. Ice-axe
  5. Harness
  6. Ice-Hammer
  7. Carabiners
  8. Water bottle
  9. Shelve-Saver

Trekking Peaks

Mera peak - 6654 m.
Region - (Khumbu Himal, Sagarmatha)
Mera Peak is the highest permitted trekking peak of Nepal. It stands to the south of Everest and dominates the watershed between the heavily wooded valleys of the Hinku and Hongu Drangkas.

Col. Jimmy Roberts and Sen Tenzing made the first successful ascent of Mera Peak on 20 May 1953. The route they used is still the standard route. There are many other routes to the peak, but none of them are easy. Some of them require crossing very high and difficult passes. This leads to a true mountaineering experience. In the end, all efforts and hard work is paid off with spectacular scenery as Mera provides one of the finest viewpoints in Nepal.

Mera Peak offers a panoramic view of Chamlang, Kangchenjunga, Makalu, and Baruntse in the east and the peaks of Cho-Oyu, Ama Dablam and Kangtega to the west. Everest can be viewed to the north over the massive unclimbed south face of Lhotse and the Nuptse/Lhotse ridge. Under favourable conditions, it is possible to climb the peak and descend on the same day.

Imja Tse (Island Peak) - 6160 m.
Region - (Khumbu Himal, Sagarmatha)
Imja Tse peak, at a height of 6,160 meters, is more popularly known by the name of Island Peak. The peak was named Island peak by Eric Shipton’s party in 1953, as the peak resembles an island in a sea of ice when viewed form Dingboche. Later in 1983, the peak was renamed as Imja Tse.

The peak was first ascended in 1953 by a British team as preparation for climbing Everest. Tenzing Norgay was one of the members who successfully summitted it.

The peak is part of the south ridge of Lhotse Shar and the main land forms a semicircle of cliffs that rise to the north of the summits of Nuptse, Lhotse, Middle Peak and Lhotse Shar. Cho Polu and Makalu lie to the east of Island Peak. Baruntse, Amphu and Ama Dablam lie to the south.

Ramdung - 5925 m.
Region - (Rolwaling Himal, Janakpur)
Ramdung stands at a height of 5,925 meters. It is situated south of Na in the upper Rolwaling region and is one of a cluster of peaks surrounding Yalung La. It provides access to upper Rolwaling from the south via the Khare Khola. A team led by Bill Murray first climbed the peak in 1952; it proved to be an ideal summit for commercial trekking and climbing groups before closure of the Rolwaling. The normal route to this mountain, through the glaciers of North-East Flank, is straightforward. The mountain offers a panoramic view of mountain ranges from Langtang to Everest and also a splendid view of Gauri Shankar and Menlungtse.

Parchamo  6187 m.
Region - (Rolwaling Himal, Janakpur)
First climbed in 1955, Parchamo is an attractive snow peak lying south of Tashi Lapcha. It has a north-by-northwest ridge, which rises from the crevassed glacier astride the Tashi Lapcha. The face of the ridge forms a uniform slope broken by crevasse and seraes rising from the rocky lower buttresses above the Drolambau Glaciers in the west. Rolwaling valley is the main access to Parchamo, though this route was closed for most of the 1980s due to potential dangers to porters crossing the Tashi Lapcha. The only other alternative route is from the Khumbu side via Namche Bazar and Thame

Ganja La Chuli (Naya Kanga) - 5844 m.
Region - (Langtang Himal, Bagmati)
Formerly known as Ganja La Chuli, Naya Kanga (5,844 m) rises to the west of Ganja La, and is a popular but difficult mountain to climb. The normal route to this peak is via the snowy north–east ridge. It is not yet clear who climbed this summit first. The most important reward of climbing Naya Kanga is the spectacular view of mountains in or near Tibet.

Pisang Peak - 6091 m.
Region - (Manang District, Gandaki)
Pisang Peak offers good scope for exploration. The western flank of the mountain is guarded by a hanging glacier and offers considerable challenge. The western end of the ridge is guarded by huge rock slabs, which make it difficult to climb. A German Expedition made the first ascent of Pisang Peak in 1955.

Tharpu Chuli (Tent Peak) - 5663 m.
Region - (Annapurna Himal, Gandaki)
Situated in the heart of the Annapurna Sanctuary, Tharpu Chuli is an attractive mountain. It is a part of a ridgeline and is located south from the glacier dome. It includes Singu Chuli and acts as a central divider between the semicircle of peaks enclosing the Sanctuary. Tharpu Chuli is an interesting climb to the top and also offers a spectacular view of the Annapurna mountains. The peak was nicknamed “Tent Peak “ by Col. Jimmy Roberts in 1956.

Chulu East - 6584 m.
Region - (Manang District, Gandaki)
First climbed in 1955 by a German expedition via the north-east ridge, the peak of Chulu East, together with Chulu West, forms an integral part of the Manang Himal, which in turn is part of the Larger Damodar Himal. Chulu East lying south east of Chulu West is a comparatively smaller peak.

Chulu West - 6419 m.
Region - (Manang District, Gandaki)
It was first ascended in 1952 by a Japanese Expedition. The Base Camp of this peak is situated in a small valley north of Manang, off the main trail to the Thorang La. There is a controversy regarding the name and location of the Chulu peaks. There are several peaks close by and are also a part of Chulu massif but are not indicated in the map. Thus it is difficult to differentiate between the two Chulus. However, the Chulu group comprises of four peaks: two in the east and two in the west. Chulu West may also be called Chulu Central. There is no technical difficulty in ascending this peak but progress can be slow as the slopes are vulnerable to avalanches in certain conditions.

Climbing Seasons

Peak Climbing Seasons

 

Spring

Fall

Peak Climbing

March

April

May

September

October

November

Expedition

March

April

May

September

October

November